Academic Writing Process: Reading and annotating: Skim

[</a>This post is part of a series about the digital tools I use to assist me in reading, writing, teaching and living.](http://skim-app.sourceforge.net/)</em></p>

[Skim](http://skim-app.sourceforge.net/) (Mac OS only) is what Adobe Acrobat wants to be when it grows up, at least as a reading and annotation tool. While Acrobat Pro is hard to beat for OCR, PDF creation and optimization, it falls short in the realm of note-taking and annotation.

Stage in my thought process: One (Information Gathering)

Where I use it: Reading books and articles for research, including those digitized from the [photography process.](http://www.kalanicraig.com/2010/01/digital-archiving-canon-point-and-shoot-camera-plus-chdk-firmware-photoshop-and-acrobat/)

What goes in it: My annotations on important sections in academic publications.

Why I chose it: Skim's primary purpose is note-taking. Acrobat has note-taking options, but that's not its primary goal, and the interface difference makes that very clear. Skim offers several different colors of highlighting, easy annotation, sticky notes, export formats and a number of search and filter features on notes that make it a clear winner.

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